Review: “Avengers: Infinity War”

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Review: “Avengers: Infinity War”

George Beatty, Staff Writer

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Last Thursday, the highly anticipated Avengers: Infinity War was released to general audiences. The 19th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU)  is, as of April 30, certified fresh on Rotten Tomatoes with an 83 percent approval by critics and 93 percent by fans.

Part one of the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s (MCU) crescendo had the tremendous task of living up to the hype which first began when the villainous Thanos was revealed in the post-credit scene of Marvel’s The Avengers, released in 2012. In general, Infinity War was well shot, scored, edited, and was crafted with the same or greater care that has been put into all recent Marvel movies. As with many Marvel movies, the greatest and worst parts of the film lie in its characters and plot; and when I say worst, I mean it relatively. I would not say that any part of the movie is particularly bad, any particular scene ranges from average upwards. The film really fleshes out Thanos’ character, but struggles with juggling the many other characters it includes.

Really, Avengers: Infinity War was less of an Avengers movie, and more of a Thanos movie. Despite being the antagonist, Thanos is the character that the whole plot centers around, and in certain parts it completely focuses on him and his character. Marvel Studios has made sure to not let Thanos — his motivations and character — fall flat in the same way other MCU villains have. The biggest criticism of the last Avengers film, Avengers: Age of Ultron, was the lack of characterisation and relatability of the villain. However, by letting Thanos take center stage and giving him emotional moments and relatable motivations, the studio has implemented a great screen adaptation of one of Marvel’s most notorious and loved villains.

While there are many reasons to praise the film, it does struggle with its sheer scale and the inclusion of so many characters. Many characters do not have profound characterisation or defining moments, and this is not exclusive to side characters. Most notably, Captain America’s squadron of characters, including Black Panther and the other Wakandans, go without much meaningful dialogue or screen time. Granted, it would be slightly unrealistic to expect meaningful dialogue and screen time for all 36 characters in the film, but that does not mediate the fact that some important characters in the franchise fell flat.

Marvel is continuing to create a well-crafted, unprecedented cinematic universe with a well developed and compelling roster of characters. Personally, I enjoyed infinity war a lot, It was everything I wasn’t expecting. From the beginning, Marvel puts real stakes into the movie, showing Thanos’ overwhelming power and ability as a villain, while making him relatable and arguably justified throughout the film, and despite its shortcomings in giving each character meaningful dialogue and interactions, is still a film I would highly recommend for Marvel and MCU fans.

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