Review: the circle

Hudson Young, Staff Writer

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Based off the 2013 book written by Dave Eggers, The Circle is a modern day story with realistic attributes. Actress Emma Watson plays Mae Holland, a young adult who gets a job at the gigantic corporation that prides itself on surveillance and the perfectibility of the human beings.

Drawn into the community of the Circle and all of the thousands of employees, Mae quickly gets settled in with her new job and discovers how far technology can take her. Besides her work, Mae must keep up with her popularity rankings, done so by going to events and being social with others. One of the Circle’s overseer’s, Eamon Bailey, played by Tom Hanks increases the company with new ideas that can change society. These include putting miniature cameras around the world to check the weather, traffic, or any data a person may need.  The goal, of the company is to monitor all aspects of human existence.

After months of working at the Circle, Mae has earned a free health care plan for her parents and has gained popularity among the other circlers. While at a party, she runs into a man who knows an extreme amount of information regarding the Circle and it’s future. Given no name, the mystery man gives Mae a tour of where all the storage is kept and how the information can affect everyone. Mae soon realizes the danger of having every part of her life broadcasted and watched.

With few good reviews, The Circle focuses on the themes of how people view themselves and the idea of transparency. How do people react when they are being watched? Do they behave better or worse? The book explores these questions and more about lying, secrets, and being social. It is a good example on how society may be working now.

With opening this weekend, The Circle has gotten mixed reviews. Those who haven’t read the book find the movie dull with no plot, which makes sense. Reading the book gives more information on the characters and what they may be thinking.
One thing is for sure, both the book and film bring up excellent questions  after reading or watching. Eamon Bailey brings up multiple points on how humans act when under certain circumstances. Audiences wonder themselves if the film could be true. Viewers can’t help but think about themselves personally and how they act under others watching. This critically acclaimed book and well-casted film may not be true, yet some of the points can reflect with how people live their lives.

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